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RESEARCH PAPERS

Computational Dynamics of Multibody Systems: History, Formalisms, and Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Peter Eberhard

Institute B of Mechanics,  University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germanyeberhard@mechb.uni-stuttgart.de

Werner Schiehlen

Institute B of Mechanics,  University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germanyschiehlen@mechb.uni-stuttgart.de

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 1(1), 3-12 (May 24, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1961875 History: Received May 03, 2005; Revised May 24, 2005

Multibody dynamics is based on analytical mechanics and is applied to engineering systems such as a wide variety of machines and all kind of vehicles. Multibody dynamics depends on computational dynamics and is closely related to control design and vibration theory. Recent developments in multibody dynamics focus on elastic or flexible systems, respectively, contact and impact problems, and actively controlled systems. Some fundamentals in multibody dynamics, recursive algorithms and methods for dynamical analysis are presented. In particular, methods from linear system analysis and nonlinear dynamics approaches are discussed. Also, applications from vehicles, manufacturing science and molecular dynamics are shown.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Reference systems for flexible multibody systems

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Figure 2

Topology of multibody systems

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Figure 3

Three-body system with two joints

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Figure 4

Characteristics of a Duffing oscillator (from Bestle (48))

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Figure 5

Control of vehicle convoy

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Figure 6

Schematic view of the machine tool

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Figure 7

Lambda kinematics machine

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Figure 8

Simulation result for the position error ΔxHS of the support H with linear (short dashed) and nonlinear (long dashed) controller, assumed disturbance of 30% of the moment of inertia of rod and cantilever

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Figure 9

Planar simulation of 1950 contacting bodies, where the color/brightness corresponds to the kinetic energy of the particles (red/light means high, blue/dark means low)

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Figure 10

Spatial simulation of 29 841 bodies computed on eight processors and distributed to 84÷466 processes, where the color/brightness corresponds to the kinetic energy of the particles (red/light means high, blue/dark means low)

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Figure 11

Dynamic domain decomposition of the domain shown in Fig. 1 in an exploded view. One box corresponds to one process

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