0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Development of Elastic Forces for a Large Deformation Plate Element Based on the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

[+] Author and Article Information
Aki M. Mikkola

Institute of Mechatronics and Virtual Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta, Finlandaki.mikkola@lut.fi

Marko K. Matikainen

Institute of Mechatronics and Virtual Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta, Finlandmarko.matikainen@lut.fi

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 1(2), 103-108 (May 20, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1961870 History: Received February 17, 2005; Revised May 20, 2005

Dynamic analysis of large rotation and deformation can be carried out using the absolute nodal coordinate formulation. This formulation, which utilizes global displacements and slope coordinates as nodal variables, make it possible to avoid the difficulties that arise when a rotation is interpolated in three-dimensional applications. In the absolute nodal coordinate formulation, a continuum mechanics approach has become the dominating procedure when elastic forces are defined. It has recently been perceived, however, that the continuum mechanics based absolute nodal coordinate elements suffer from serious shortcomings, including Poisson’s locking and poor convergence rate. These problems can be circumvented by modifying the displacement field of a finite element in the definition of elastic forces. This allows the use of the mixed type interpolation technique, leading to accurate and efficient finite element formulations. This approach has been previously applied to two- and three-dimensional absolute nodal coordinate based finite elements. In this study, the improved approach for elastic forces is extended to the absolute nodal coordinate plate element. The introduced plate element is compared in static examples to the continuum mechanics based absolute nodal coordinate plate element, as well as to commercial finite element software. A simple dynamic analysis is performed using the introduced element in order to demonstrate the capability of the element to conserve energy.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Cantilever plate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Large deformed shape of the cantilever plate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Deformed shape of the pendulum

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Energy balance of the pendulum

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Description of an arbitrary point

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In