0
Research Papers

Use of General Nonlinear Material Models in Beam Problems: Application to Belts and Rubber Chains

[+] Author and Article Information
Luis G. Maqueda, Abdel-Nasser A. Mohamed, Ahmed A. Shabana

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7022

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 5(2), 021003 (Feb 09, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000795 History: Received February 04, 2009; Revised May 14, 2009; Published February 09, 2010; Online February 09, 2010

Accurate modeling of many engineering systems requires the integration of multibody system and large deformation finite element algorithms that are based on general constitutive models, account for the coupling between the large rotation and deformation, and allow capturing coupled deformation modes that cannot be captured using beam formulations implemented in existing computational algorithms and computer codes. In this investigation, new three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic rubber chains and belt drives models are developed using the finite element absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) that allows for a straight forward implementation of general linear and nonlinear material models for structural elements such as beams, plates, and shells. Furthermore, this formulation, which is based on a more general kinematic description, can be used to predict the cross section deformation and its coupling with the extension and bending of the belt drives and rubber chains. The ANCF cross section deformation results are validated by comparison with the results obtained using solid finite elements in the case of a simple tension test problem. The effect of the use of different linear and nonlinear constitutive laws in modeling belt drive mechanisms is also examined in this investigation. The finite element formulation presented in this paper is implemented in a general purpose three-dimensional flexible multibody algorithm that allows for developing detailed models of mechanical systems subject to general loading conditions, nonlinear algebraic constraint equations, and arbitrary large displacements that characterize belt drives and tracked vehicle dynamics. The successful integration of large deformation finite element and multibody system algorithms is shown to be necessary in order to be able to study the dynamics of complex tracked vehicles with rubber chains. A computer simulation of a three-dimensional multibody tracked vehicle model that consists of twenty rigid bodies and two flexible rubber chains is used in order to demonstrate the use of the formulations presented in this investigation.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Belt drive mechanism

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Angular velocity of the driving and driven pulleys using cable element model (—▲— driving pulley; —●— driven pulley (ANCF cable element))

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Angular velocity of the driving and driven pulleys using different beam element models (—▲— driving pulley; —●— driven pulley (incompressible neo-Hookean ANCF); —◼— driven pulley (Mooney–Rivlin ANCF))

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Belt tension (—▲— analytical; —●— ANCF cable element)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Position of the center of mass of the excavator (—◼— X coordinate; —●— Y coordinate; —▲— Z coordinate)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Velocity of the center of mass of the excavator (—◼— X coordinate; —●— Y coordinate; —▲— Z coordinate)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

X coordinate of a point on the rubber chain

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Z coordinate of a point on the rubber chain

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Trajectory of a point on the rubber chain

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Pressure distribution at the contact between the rubber chain and the vehicle components

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Pressure distribution at the contact between the rubber chain and the ground

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Computer animation of the motion of the excavator

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Geometry of the contact between the belt or the rubber chain and the rigid cylindrical components

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Trilinear Coulomb friction force model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Hydraulic excavator numerical model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

305C CR mini hydraulic excavator (http://www.cat.com/cmms/images/(358303.pdf)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Absolute nodal coordinate formulation finite beam element

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Area ratio at the center of the beam (—◼— incompressible neo-Hookean solid element; —●— Mooney–Rivlin solid element; —▲— incompressible neo-Hookean ANCF beam element; —▼— Mooney–Rivlin ANCF beam element)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In