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Research Papers

Nonlinear Dynamic Behavior of Turbocharger Rotor-Bearing Systems With Hydrodynamic Oil Film and Squeeze Film Damper in Series: Prediction and Experiment

[+] Author and Article Information
K. Gjika1

 Honeywell Turbo Technologies, Zone Industrielle Inova 3000, 2 Rue de l’Avenir, 88155 Thaon-les-Vosges, Francekostandin.gjika@honeywell.com

L. San Andrés

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843

G. D. Larue

 Honeywell Turbo Technologies, 3201 West Lomita Boulevard, Torrance, CA 90505

Measurements and predictions for the 2 bar oil inlet pressure as well as at a temperature of 100°C are not presented for brevity.

1

Corresponding author.

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 5(4), 041006 (Jul 28, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001817 History: Received December 14, 2007; Revised January 09, 2010; Published July 28, 2010; Online July 28, 2010

Current trends for advanced automotive engines focusing on downsizing, better fuel efficiency, and lower emissions have led to several changes in turbocharger bearing system design and technology. Automotive turbochargers run faster and use engine oils with very low viscosity under high oil inlet temperature and low feed pressure. The development of high performing bearing systems, marrying innovation with reliability, is a persistent challenge. This paper shows progress on the nonlinear dynamic behavior modeling of the rotor-radial bearing system (RBS) incorporating two oil films in series: a hydrodynamic one with a squeeze film damper commonly used in turbochargers. The developed fluid bearing code predicts bearing rotational speed (in the case of fully floating design), operating inner and outer bearing film clearances, effective oil viscosity, taking into account its shear effect, and hydrostatic load. A rotordynamics code uses this input to predict the nonlinear lateral dynamic response of the rotor-bearing system. The model predictions are validated with test data acquired on a high speed turbocharger RBS of a 6.0 mm journal diameter running up to 250,000 rpm (maximum speed), 5W30 oil type, 150°C oil inlet temperature, and 4 bar oil feed pressure. The tests are conducted at a rotordynamics technology laboratory using a high performance data acquisition system. Turbochargers with four combinations of inner and outer RBS clearances are tested. Prediction and measured synchronous response and total motion are in good agreement. Both demonstrate the nonlinear character of the RBS behavior, including several subsynchronous frequency components across the operating speed range. The nonlinear predictive model aids the development of high performance and optimized turbocharger RBS with faster development cycle times and increased reliability.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical waterfall of measured shaft motion turbocharger supported on semifloating ring bearings

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Figure 2

Schematic view of turbocharger and radial bearing system

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Figure 3

Geometry of typical floating ring bearing and coordinate system for analysis

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Figure 4

Photograph of turbocharger hot gas test stand facility

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Figure 5

Cross section of test turbocharger with locations for measurement of lubricant pressures and temperatures

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Figure 6

Structural model of test turbocharger for rotordynamics analysis. Locations of unbalance planes noted.

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Figure 7

TC ODmin/IDmin: (a) waterfall of predicted shaft motion, (b) comparison of predicted and measured total motion and amplitude of synchronous motion, and (c) comparison of predicted and measured subsynchronous frequencies versus shaft speed. Oil inlet at 150°C and 4 bar supply pressure.

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Figure 8

TC ODmax/IDmin: (a) waterfall of predicted shaft motion, (b) comparison of predicted and measured total motion and amplitude of synchronous motion, and (c) comparison of predicted and measured subsynchronous frequencies versus shaft speed. Oil inlet at 150°C and 4 bar supply pressure.

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Figure 9

TC ODmax/IDmax: (a) waterfall of predicted shaft motion, (b) comparison of predicted and measured total motion and amplitude of synchronous motion, and (c) comparison of predicted and measured subsynchronous frequencies versus shaft speed. Oil inlet at 150°C and 4 bar supply pressure.

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Figure 10

TC ODmin/IDmax: (a) waterfall of predicted shaft motion, (b) comparison of predicted and measured total motion and amplitude of synchronous motion, and (c) comparison of predicted and measured subsynchronous frequencies versus shaft speed. Oil inlet at 150°C and 4 bar supply pressure.

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Figure 11

TC ODmin/IDmax: Predicted lowest natural frequencies and mode shapes at 2 kHz shaft speed. Comparison with measured and predicted subsynchronous whirl frequencies.

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