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Research Papers

Lateral Hunting Stability of Railway Vehicles Running on Elastic Track Structures

[+] Author and Article Information
Wanming Zhai1

Train and Track Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P.R.Chinawmzhai@swjtu.edu.cn

Kaiyun Wang

Train and Track Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P.R.China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 5(4), 041009 (Jul 28, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001908 History: Received March 18, 2009; Revised April 04, 2010; Published July 28, 2010; Online July 28, 2010

Considering the viscoelastic property of railway track structure, it is suggested in this paper to include the influence of track dynamics in calculation of lateral stability of railway vehicles running on tracks. A direct numerical method based on the stability of time histories of vehicle components is proposed to ascertain the nonlinear critical hunting speed of railway vehicles. The time histories of the vehicle system are calculated by use of the three-dimensional vehicle-track coupled models, which are capable of taking into account the influence of dynamic properties of track structures on vehicle dynamics. The effect of track system properties such as the rail fastener stiffness and the rail profile on the lateral hunting stability of the vehicle is investigated. Differences of the critical hunting speeds of vehicles on rigid track model and on elastic track model are found out. Generally, the rigid track model overestimates the critical hunting speed by 5–10% for different types of vehicles, which implies that the classical vehicle dynamics predicts higher lateral stability of a vehicle than the vehicle-track coupled dynamics does. This conclusion is of significance to the safety design of railway vehicles and should be taken notice in the design stage. The reason that causes the differences is discussed. A full-scale field experiment was carried out to investigate the hunting behavior of a freight car with three-piece bogies on a straight track. Very obvious hunting motion was observed in the experiment when the unloaded vehicle ran at the speed of 75 km/h, which verified the theoretical calculation results.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Model of vehicle-track coupled dynamics for freight car with three-piece bogies (end view)

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Figure 2

Modeling of the axle-box connection between side frame and wheelset. (a) the clearances in axle-box; (b) the longitudinal force characteristic; (c) the lateral force characteristic

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Figure 3

Typical bifurcation diagram for nonlinear railway vehicle system

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Figure 4

Lateral irregularities of (a) left rail and (b) right rail used in calculation

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Figure 5

Calculated time histories of lateral displacements of (a) the car body, (b) the front bogie frame, and (c) the leading wheelset at speed of 359 km/h

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Figure 6

Wheelset lateral shift velocity versus displacement at speed of 359 km/h

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Figure 7

Wheelset lateral shift velocity versus displacement at speed of 360 km/h

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Figure 8

Calculated time histories of lateral displacements of (a) the car body, (b) the front bogie frame, and (c) the leading wheelset at speed of 360 km/h

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Figure 9

Comparison of lateral wheel-rail creepages obtained using the elastic track model and the rigid track model

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Figure 10

Effects of (a) vertical stiffness Kpv and (b) lateral stiffness Kph of rail fastener system on vehicle critical hunting speed

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Figure 11

Location of measurement sensors on the tested vehicle

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Figure 12

Measured time history of car body lateral acceleration at speed of 60 km/h

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Figure 13

Measured time history of car body lateral acceleration at speed of 75 km/h, where (b) is the enlargement of the dashed window in figure (a)

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Figure 14

Measured frequency spectra of car body lateral acceleration at speeds of (a) 60 km/h and (b) 75 km/h

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