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Research Papers

Development and Validation of Geometry-Based Compliant Contact Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Lianzhen Luo

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Centre for Intelligent Machines, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3A 2K6, Canadalzluo@cim.mcgill.ca

Meyer Nahon

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Centre for Intelligent Machines, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3A 2K6, Canadameyer.nahon@mcgill.ca

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam. 6(1), 011004 (Sep 28, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002090 History: Received June 01, 2009; Revised March 12, 2010; Published September 28, 2010; Online September 28, 2010

Simulations are often used to evaluate space manipulator tasks that involve contact with the environment, due to the difficulty of performing realistic earth-based experiments. An important aspect of these simulations is the contact model used to determine the interbody forces between two objects in contact. In this paper, we present two compliant contact models for polyhedral contacting objects. These models explicitly consider the distinction between true contact geometry and interference geometry. To account for the energy dissipated during impact, a damping force is included in the two models. Model validation is then performed in three ways: against analytical models, against experimental data, and against finite element method (FEM) models. The results of the validation exercise demonstrate the fidelity of the proposed models.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Cone indenter (b) contact area of cone indenter

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Figure 2

The extreme cases of the three contact types: point, line, and face contact

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Figure 3

Overlap geometry and planar overlap (contact) polygon

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Figure 4

Cross section of a cone or a wedge indenting a plate

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Figure 5

Linearized polyhedra of contact geometric objects

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Figure 6

A cone dropped on a plate

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Figure 7

Penetration distance and contact force for cone case

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Figure 8

Penetration distance and contact force for sphere case

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Figure 9

Penetration distance and contact force for cylinder case (transversely)

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Figure 10

Penetration distance and contact force for cylinder case (axially)

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Figure 11

Steel ball with accelerometer and cylindrical specimen

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Figure 12

Comparison of contact force profiles, for specimens C1 and C2, for comprehensive model (solid line) and experimental data of Ref. 3 (dashed line): (a) δ̇(−)=0.0938 m/s (C1), (b) δ̇(−)=0.5 m/s (C1), (c) δ̇(−)=0.0938 m/s (C2), and (d) δ̇(−)=0.5 m/s (C2)

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Figure 13

FE mesh for a cylinder axially impacting a plate

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Figure 14

A cone impacting a plate

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Figure 15

A cylinder transversely impacting a plate

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Figure 16

A cylinder axially impacting a plate

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Figure 17

Cube impacting a plate on a vertex, edge, and face

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Figure 18

Cube-plate in point contact

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Figure 19

Cube-plate in line contact

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Figure 20

Cube-plate in face contact

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