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Research Papers

Dynamics and Control of a Small-Scale Boom Crane

[+] Author and Article Information
Ehsan Maleki

The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332ehsan.maleki@gatech.edu

William Singhose

The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332singhose@gatech.edu

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 6(3), 031015 (Mar 02, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003251 History: Received December 22, 2009; Revised December 10, 2010; Published March 02, 2011; Online March 02, 2011

Cranes are vital to many manufacturing and material-handling processes. However, their physical structure leads to flexible dynamic effects that limit their usefulness. Large payload swings induced by either intentional crane motions or external disturbances decrease positioning accuracy and can create hazardous situations. Boom cranes are one of the most dynamically complicated types of cranes. Boom cranes cannot transfer the payload in a straight line by actuating only one axis of motion because they have rotational joints. This paper presents a nonlinear model of a boom crane. A large range of possible motions is analyzed to investigate the dynamic behavior of the crane when it responds to operator commands. A command-shaping control technique is implemented, and its effectiveness on this nonlinear machine is analyzed. Experimental results verify key theoretical predictions.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

A small-scale mobile boom crane

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Figure 2

The input-shaping process

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Figure 3

Model of a boom crane

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Figure 4

Tangential payload oscillation for slewing distances of 50 deg and 60 deg

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Figure 5

Payload oscillation during a 360 deg slew

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Figure 6

Payload oscillation resulting from a 10 deg slew

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Figure 7

Payload response from a 10 deg slew

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Figure 8

Average transient deflection versus slewing distance

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Figure 9

Residual vibration amplitude versus slewing distance

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Figure 10

Residual vibration amplitude versus luff angle

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Figure 11

Slewing residual vibration amplitude

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Figure 12

Slewing transient deflection

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Figure 13

Experimental slewing response

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Figure 14

Experimental slewing residual vibration amplitude

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Figure 16

Radial payload oscillation for an upward luff from 30 deg to 60 deg

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Figure 17

Transient deflection versus luffing distance

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Figure 18

Residual vibration amplitude versus luffing distance

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Figure 19

Residual vibration amplitude versus initial luff angle

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Figure 20

Upward luffing residual vibration amplitude

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Figure 21

Radial payload oscillation for level luffing from 30 deg to 90 deg

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Figure 22

Upward level luffing residual vibration amplitude

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Figure 23

Experimental luffing response

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Figure 24

Experimental upward level luffing residual vibration amplitude

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