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Research Papers

Supercavitating Vehicles With Noncylindrical, Nonsymmetric Cavities: Dynamics and Instabilities

[+] Author and Article Information
Vincent Nguyen

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742vince1@umd.edu

Balakumar Balachandran

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742balab@umd.edu

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 6(4), 041001 (Mar 09, 2011) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003408 History: Received August 22, 2010; Revised December 19, 2010; Published March 09, 2011; Online March 09, 2011

Cavity-wall interactions play an important role in determining the dynamics of supercavitating vehicles. To date, supercavitating vehicle system models make use of constant cylindrical cavities. As a further step, in this work, a dive-plane model with noncylindrical and nonsymmetric cavity shapes is developed. Cavitator angle of attack effects are considered, and a noncylindrical planing force model is incorporated. The system dynamics is examined in terms of nonlinear instabilities and the tail-slap phenomenon, and it is shown that the cavity shape plays a critical role in determining the system dynamics. The effectiveness of feedback control strategies with fin and cavitator inputs to achieve vehicle stability is also discussed.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Supercavitating vehicle

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Figure 2

Coordinate system definition for system model

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Figure 4

Nondimensional cavity shape with angle of attack effects

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Figure 5

Three different scenarios in modeling body-cavity interactions: (a) vehicle within a cylindrical cavity, (b) vehicle within a cylindrical cavity with shifted axis, and (c) vehicle within a noncylindrical cavity

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Figure 6

Diagram of a cylinder planing on a cylindrical surface

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Figure 7

Results obtained with cylindrical planing force formulation and linear feedback

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Figure 8

Results obtained with cylindrical planing force formulation and modified linear feedback in the presence of downwash effects

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Figure 9

Illustration for cylindrical cavity assumption

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Figure 10

Cavity approximated by a series of short cylindrical sections

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Figure 11

Planing force variation for the noncylindrical planing force model

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Figure 12

Normalized planing force versus vertical speed w and cavitator actuation angle dc for noncylindrical planing force model

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Figure 13

Results obtained with noncylindrical planing force formulation and linear feedback. Cavitation number is σ=0.0335.

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Figure 14

Results obtained with noncylindrical planing force formulation and linear feedback. Cavitation number is σ=0.025.

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Figure 15

Results obtained with noncylindrical planing force formulation and linear feedback. Cavitation number is σ=0.037.

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Figure 16

L2 norm of the equilibrium points versus cavitation number

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Figure 17

Projection of steady-state behavior of system in the w−q plane versus cavitation number σ

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Figure 18

Projection of steady-state behavior of system in the w−q plane versus cavitation number σ showing two-sided tail-slap behavior

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Figure 19

L2 norm of the equilibrium points versus cavitation number using washout filter

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Figure 20

Results obtained with noncylindrical planing force formulation and washout filter. Cavitation number is σ=0.034.

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Figure 21

L2 norm of the equilibrium points versus cavitation number using linear feedback and constant fin input

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