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Research Papers

Influence of the Fastening Modeling on the Vehicle-Track Interaction at Singular Rail Surface Defects

[+] Author and Article Information
Xin Zhao

Section of Road and Railway Engineering,
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences,
Delft University of Technology, Stevinweg 1,
Delft 2628, The Netherlands
State Key Laboratory of Traction Power,
Southwest Jiaotong University,
Section 1 of the Second Ring Road North,
No. 111,
Chengdu 610031, China
e-mail: xinzhao@home.swjtu.edu.cn

Zili Li

Section of Road and Railway Engineering,
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences,
Delft University of Technology,
Stevinweg 1,
Delft 2628, The Netherlands
e-mail: z.li@tudelft.nl

Rolf Dollevoet

Section of Road and Railway Engineering,
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences,
Delft University of Technology,
Stevinweg 1,
Delft 2628, The Netherlands
e-mail: r.p.b.j.dollevoet@tudelft.nl

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICS. Manuscript received January 31, 2013; final manuscript received October 31, 2013; published online February 13, 2014. Assoc. Editor: José L. Escalona.

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 9(3), 031002 (Feb 13, 2014) (11 pages) Paper No: CND-13-1025; doi: 10.1115/1.4025895 History: Received January 31, 2013; Revised October 31, 2013

With up to 12 spring-damper groups distributed in the actual area of a rail pad, different fastening models are developed in this paper to include the nonuniform pressure distribution within a fastening system and model the constraints at the rail bottom more realistically for the purpose of high frequency dynamics between vehicle and track. Applied to a 3D transient FE model of the vehicle-track interaction, influence of the fastening modeling on the high frequency dynamic contact forces at singular rail surface defects (SRSDs) is examined. Two defect models, one is relatively large and the other is small, are employed. Such a work is of practical significance because squats, as a kind of SRSD, have become a wide spread problem. Results show that the fastening modeling plays an important role in the high frequency dynamic contact forces at SRSDs. Supports in the middle of the rail bottom, modeled as spring-damper groups located under rail web, are found to be most important. The less the rail bottom is constrained or supported, the more isolated the sleepers and substructure are from the wheel-rail interaction, and the more kinetic energy is kept in the rail after impact at a SRSD. Rolling speed is also varied to take into account its influence. Finally, based on the results of this work, influence of the service states of the fastening system on growth of relatively small SRSDs is discussed.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The loaded configuration of a track when one wheel passes. Due to the rail bending and rotation under wheel load, and the rail inclination, the pressure distribution within a rail pad is nonuniform, and changes as the wheel moves. (a) In the longitudinal-vertical plane, (b) in the lateral-vertical plane.

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Fig. 2

The 3D transient FE model of the vehicle-track interaction employed in this work. (a) A schematic diagram, (b) the mesh, and (c) Mesh details in the contact surfaces.

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Fig. 3

Schematic diagrams of different fastening models (overlook the rail pad) employed in this work. Every rhombus symbol represents a spring-damper group. (a) F_12: 12 spring-damper groups, (b) F_4: 4 spring-damper groups, (c) F_2_in and F_2_ou: 2 spring-damper groups, and (d) F_6: 6 spring-damper groups.

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Fig. 4

Two SRSD models simulated in this work. (a) Defect 1 and (b) Defect 2.

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Fig. 5

The dynamic forces at Defect 1 as the fastening models of F_12 and F_4 are applied. (a) The dynamic forces and (b) the amplitude spectra (by FFT).

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Fig. 6

The dynamic forces at Defect 1 as the fastening models of F_4 and F_2_in are applied

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Fig. 7

The dynamic forces at Defect 1 as the fastening models of F_2_in and F_2_ou are applied. (a) The dynamic forces and (b) the amplitude spectra (by FFT).

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Fig. 8

Variation of the vertical acceleration at the rail seat area of sleeper 1

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Fig. 9

The dynamic forces at Defect 1 as the fastening models of F_6 and F_2_ou are applied

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Fig. 10

The dynamic forces at Defects 1 and 2 with the fastening model of F_12. (a) The dynamic forces, and (b) the amplitude spectra (by FFT).

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Fig. 11

The dynamic forces at Defects 1 and 2 with the fastening model of F_2_ou. (a) The dynamic forces, and (b) the amplitude spectra (by FFT).

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Fig. 12

The dynamic forces excited by Defect 2 under different rolling speeds when the fastening model of F_12 is employed

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Fig. 13

The amplitude spectra (by FFT) of the dynamic forces excited by Defect 2. The fastening model of F_12 is employed and the rolling speed varies.

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Fig. 14

The dynamic forces excited by Defect 2 under different speeds when the fastening model of F_2_ou is employed

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Fig. 15

Influence of rolling speed on maximum dynamic force at Defect 2. Fastening models of F_12 and F_2_ou are considered.

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