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Research Papers

Parallel Computing in Multibody System Dynamics: Why, When, and How

[+] Author and Article Information
Dan Negrut

Simulation-Based Engineering Lab,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: negrut@wisc.edu

Radu Serban

Simulation-Based Engineering Lab,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: serban@wisc.edu

Hammad Mazhar

Simulation-Based Engineering Lab,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: hmazhar@wisc.edu

Toby Heyn

Simulation-Based Engineering Lab,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: heyn @wisc.edu

We use GB to denote gigabytes and Gb for gigabits. Eight Gb make one GB.

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 19, 2013; final manuscript received March 24, 2014; published online July 11, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Javier Cuadrado.

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 9(4), 041007 (Jul 11, 2014) (12 pages) Paper No: CND-13-1144; doi: 10.1115/1.4027313 History: Received June 19, 2013; Revised March 24, 2014

This paper addresses three questions related to the use of parallel computing in multibody dynamics (MBD) simulation. The “why parallel computing?” question is answered based on the argument that in the upcoming decade parallel computing represents the main source of speed improvement in MBD simulation. The answer to “when is it relevant?” is built around the observation that MBD software users are increasingly interested in multi-physics problems that cross disciplinary boundaries and lead to large sets of equations. The “how?” question is addressed by providing an overview of the state of the art in parallel computing. Emphasis is placed on parallelization approaches and support tools specific to MBD simulation. Three MBD applications are presented where parallel computing has been used to increase problem size and/or reduce time to solution. The paper concludes with a summary of best practices relevant when mapping MBD solutions onto parallel computing hardware.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Contact i between two bodies A, B ∈ {1, 2,…, nb}

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Fig. 2

Cross-section view of 3D normal contact forces in granular material (modeled using 0.6 × 106 rigid bodies), during impact by spherical object

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Fig. 3

Coupling of the fluid and solid phases. BCE and fluid markers are represented by black and white circles, respectively

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Fig. 6

Top view of simulation results obtained for Γ = 0.4 and f= 0.38

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Fig. 7

Snapshot from Mars Rover simulation at t = 4.41s, with two million terrain bodies using MPI-enabled parallelism on 64 cores. Animation available at Ref. [76].

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Fig. 8

Snapshot from Mars Rover simulation at t = 4.41s, showing the “footprint” of the rover wheels with grousers in granular terrain composed of 2 × 106 rigid bodies

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Fig. 4

Light tracked vehicle operating on gravel

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Fig. 5

Magnitude of force experienced by one revolute joint on granular terrain

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