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Research Papers

Asynchronous Vibration Response Characteristics of Aero-Engine With Support Looseness Fault

[+] Author and Article Information
H. F. Wang

College of Civil Aviation,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics,
No. 29, Jiangjun Dadao, Jiangning District,
Nanjing 211106, China
e-mail: wanghaifei1986318@163.com

G. Chen

College of Civil Aviation,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics,
No. 29, Jiangjun Dadao, Jiangning District,
Nanjing 211106, China
e-mail: cgzyx@263.net

P. P. Song

College of Civil Aviation,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics
and Astronautics,
No. 29, Jiangjun Dadao, Jiangning District,
Nanjing 211106, China
e-mail: spp0104@sina.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICS. Manuscript received April 13, 2015; final manuscript received August 3, 2015; published online October 23, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Stefano Lenci.

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 11(3), 031013 (Oct 23, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: CND-15-1097; doi: 10.1115/1.4031245 History: Received April 13, 2015; Revised August 03, 2015

In this paper, the mechanism of the asynchronous vibration response phenomenon caused by the looseness fault in the aero-engine whole vibration system is investigated by numerical integration methods. A single degree-of-freedom (DOF) lumped mass model and a rotor-casing whole vibration model of a real engine are established, and two looseness fault models are introduced. The response of these two systems is obtained by numerical integration methods, and the asynchronous response characteristics are analyzed. By comparing the response of a single DOF lumped mass model with the response of multiple DOF model, the reason leading to the asynchronous response characteristics is the relationship between the changing period of stiffness and the changing period of the rotational speed. When the changing period of stiffness is equivalent to the changing period of the rotational speed, frequency multiplication will appear and the natural frequency will be excited at specific speeds. When the changing period of stiffness is equivalent to n (n = 2, 3,…) times the changing period of the rotating speed, 1/n (n = 2, 3,…) frequency division and frequency multiplication will appear and the natural frequency will be excited at specific speeds.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Mass and foundation looseness model sketch

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Fig. 2

Waveform characteristics at 1/2 times the natural frequency; (a) waveform, (b) waveform (the result of Literature [1]), (c) spectrum, (d) waveform, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 3

Waveform characteristics at 1/3 times the natural frequency; (a) waveform, (b) waveform (the result of Literature [1]), (c) spectrum, (d) waveform, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 4

Waveform characteristics at 2/5 times the natural frequency; (a) waveform, (b) spectrum, (c) waveform (the result of Literature [1]), (d) spectrum (the result of Literature [1]), (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 5

Waveform characteristics at 3/7 times the natural frequency; (a) waveform, (b) spectrum, (c) waveform (the result of Literature [1]), (d) spectrum (the result of Literature [1]), (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 6

Waveform characteristics at 4/9 times the natural frequency; (a) waveform, (b) spectrum, (c) waveform (the result of Literature [1]), (d) spectrum (the result of Literature [1]), (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 7

Cascade plot showing under subcritical speeds

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Fig. 8

Campbell diagram showing inferred generalized subcritical, transcritical, and supercritical response

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Fig. 9

Rotor-bearing-casing model sketch map of a type of real aeroengine (unit:mm)

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Fig. 10

Solving flow for rotor-casing coupling dynamics

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Fig. 11

Amplitude-speed curve of casing lateral acceleration (without looseness)

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Fig. 12

Cascade plot of the casing acceleration response under 15,000–70,000 rpm

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Fig. 13

The waveform characteristics at 1/3 times the second-order critical speed; (a) waveform before noise reduction, (b) waveform after noise reduction, (c) spectrum before noise reduction, (d) spectrum after noise reduction, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 14

The waveform characteristics at 1/3 times the third-order critical speed; (a) waveform before noise reduction, (b) waveform after noise reduction, (c) spectrum before noise reduction, (d) spectrum after noise reduction, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 15

The waveform characteristics at 1/2 times the second-order critical speed; (a) waveform before noise reduction, (b) waveform after noise reduction, (c) spectrum before noise reduction, (d) spectrum after noise reduction, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 16

The waveform characteristics at 5/4 times the first-order critical speed; (a) waveform before noise reduction, (b) waveform after noise reduction, (c) spectrum before noise reduction, (d) spectrum after noise reduction, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 17

The waveform characteristics at two times the first-order critical speed; (a) waveform before noise reduction, (b) waveform after noise reduction, (c) spectrum before noise reduction, (d) spectrum after noise reduction, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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Fig. 18

The waveform characteristics at the third critical speed; (a) waveform before noise reduction, (b) waveform after noise reduction, (c) spectrum before noise reduction, (d) spectrum after noise reduction, (e) waveform, and (f) waveform

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