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Research Papers

Dynamics of a Deployable Mesh Reflector of Satellite Antenna: Parallel Computation and Deployment Simulation1

[+] Author and Article Information
Pei Li

Key Laboratory of Autonomous Navigation
and Control for Deep Space Exploration,
Ministry of Industry and Information Technology,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China;
MOE Key Laboratory of Dynamics
and Control of Flight Vehicle,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: lipei0603@sina.com

Cheng Liu

Key Laboratory of Autonomous Navigation
and Control for Deep Space Exploration,
Ministry of Industry and Information Technology,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China;
MOE Key Laboratory of Dynamics
and Control of Flight Vehicle,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: liucheng_bit@aliyun.com

Qiang Tian

Key Laboratory of Autonomous Navigation
and Control for Deep Space Exploration,
Ministry of Industry and Information Technology,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China;
MOE Key Laboratory of Dynamics
and Control of Flight Vehicle,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: tianqiang_hust@aliyun.com

Haiyan Hu

Key Laboratory of Autonomous Navigation
and Control for Deep Space Exploration,
Ministry of Industry and Information Technology,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China;
MOE Key Laboratory of Dynamics and Control of Flight Vehicle,
School of Aerospace Engineering,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: haiyan_hu@bit.edu.cn

Yanping Song

Institute of Space Antenna Technology,
Xi'an Institute of Space Radio Technology,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 71000, China

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICS. Manuscript received October 21, 2015; final manuscript received May 11, 2016; published online July 13, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Paramsothy Jayakumar.

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 11(6), 061005 (Jul 13, 2016) (16 pages) Paper No: CND-15-1341; doi: 10.1115/1.4033657 History: Received October 21, 2015; Revised May 11, 2016

The finite-element approach of absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) is a possible way to simulate the deployment dynamics of a large-scale mesh reflector of satellite antenna. However, the large number of finite elements of ANCF significantly increases the dimension of the dynamic equations for the deployable mesh reflector and leads to a great challenge for the efficient dynamic simulation. A new parallel computation methodology is proposed to solve the differential algebraic equations for the mesh reflector multibody system. The mesh reflector system is first decomposed into several independent subsystems by cutting its joints or finite-element grids. Then, the Schur complement method is used to eliminate the internal generalized coordinates of each subsystem and the Lagrange multipliers for joint constraint equations associated with the internal variables. With an increase of the number of subsystems, the dimension of simultaneous linear equations generated in the numerical solution process will inevitably increase. By using the multilevel decomposition approach, the dimension of the simultaneous linear equations is further reduced. Two numerical examples are used to validate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed parallel computation methodology. Finally, the dynamic simulation for a 500 s deployment process of a complex AstroMesh reflector with over 190,000 generalized coordinates is efficiently completed within 78 hrs.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The deployable antenna reflector composed of two meshes on a ring truss: (a) the whole reflector under constraints and (b) a parallelogram mechanism

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Fig. 2

The schematic view of the multilevel decomposition approach

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Fig. 7

The initial configuration of a spatial mesh: (a) view projected onto XY-plane and (b) view projected onto XZ-plane

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Fig. 5

The spatial double pendulum with spherical and revolute joints

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Fig. 6

The multilevel decomposition process for a spatial double pendulum

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Fig. 8

The multilevel decomposition process of a cable net

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Fig. 3

The overall computation flow of the parallel computation algorithm

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Fig. 4

MPI parallel computation strategy based on the multilevel decomposition approach

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Fig. 9

The CPU time of 1 s long simulations for different mesh size and solver type

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Fig. 10

The schematic views of the reflector joints: (a) the joints of the ring truss, (b) the joints of the mesh, and (c) the joints connecting two neighboring parallelogram mechanisms

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Fig. 13

The degenerative driving force along the diagonal members

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Fig. 11

The determination of initial deployment state of mesh reflector by a shrinking process

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Fig. 12

The recursive parallel computation strategy for the mesh reflector

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Fig. 19

The contours of von Mises stress of the front mesh

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Fig. 20

Typical dynamic configurations of the deployment process

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Fig. 14

The influence of the stiffness of the ring truss on the deployment angle

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Fig. 15

The influence of the tension forces of the mesh on the deployment angle

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Fig. 16

The transverse deflections of battens in the ring truss: (a) the definition of transverse deflection and (b) the transverse deflections of battens

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Fig. 17

The transverse deflections of upper longerons in the ring truss: (a) the in-plane transverse deflections of upper longerons and (b) the out-of-plane transverse deflections of upper longerons

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Fig. 18

The transverse deflections of lower longerons in the ring truss: (a) The in-plane transverse deflections of lower longerons and (b) the out-of-plane transverse deflection of lower longerons

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