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Research Papers

Rail Passenger Vehicle Crashworthiness Simulations Using Multibody Dynamics Approaches

[+] Author and Article Information
Yan Quan Sun

Centre for Railway Engineering,
CQ University, Bruce Highway,
Rockhampton, QLD 4701, Australia
e-mail: y.q.sun@cqu.edu.au

Maksym Spiryagin

Centre for Railway Engineering,
CQ University,
Bruce Highway,
Rockhampton, QLD 4701, Australia
e-mail: m.spiryagin@cqu.edu.au

Colin Cole

Centre for Railway Engineering,
CQ University,
Bruce Highway,
Rockhampton, QLD 4701, Australia
e-mail: c.cole@cqu.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICS. Manuscript received July 7, 2016; final manuscript received December 7, 2016; published online February 8, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Corina Sandu.

J. Comput. Nonlinear Dynam 12(4), 041015 (Feb 08, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: CND-16-1325; doi: 10.1115/1.4035470 History: Received July 07, 2016; Revised December 07, 2016

Multibody dynamics approaches have nowadays been an essential part in examining train crashworthiness. A typical passenger train structure has been investigated on its crashworthiness using three-dimensional (3D) models of a single passenger car and multiple cars formulated using multibody dynamics approaches. The simulation results indicate that the crush length or crush force or both of the crush mechanisms in the high and low energy (HE and LE) crush zones of a passenger train have to be increased for the higher crash speeds. The results on multiple cars (up to ten cars) show that the design of HE and LE crush zones is significantly influenced by the number of cars. The energy absorbed by the HE zone is reasonably consistent for train models with more than four cars at the crash speed of 35 km/h. The comparison of simulations can identify the contribution of the number of cars to the head-on crash forces. The influence of train mass on the design of both HE and LE crush zones, and the influence of design of the crush zones on the wheel-rail contacts are examined.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Passenger car model in gensys (a) passenger car and (b) passenger car bogie

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Fig. 2

Combined wheel-rail contact model and track model

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Fig. 3

Train model with six cars

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Fig. 4

Crush zone modeling

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Fig. 5

Characteristics of idealized crush zones

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Fig. 6

Crush zone modeling (a) HE crush zone and (b) LE crush zone

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Fig. 7

Single car collision responses (a) impact forces and (b) longitudinal decelerations

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Fig. 8

Single and multiple car simulation results (a) head-on crash forces, (b) first coupler forces, and (c) longitudinal accelerations of first car

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Fig. 9

Simulation results for modified design of crush force (a) frontal crash forces, (b) first coupler forces, and (c) longitudinal accelerations of first car

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Fig. 10

Simulation results for modified design of crush length (a) frontal impact forces, (b) first coupler forces, (c) longitudinal displacements and velocities of first car, and (d) longitudinal accelerations of first car

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Fig. 11

Relationships with number of passenger cars (a) crush force and length and (b) absorbed energy

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Fig. 12

Simulation results (a) frontal impact forces, (b) coupler forces, and (c) longitudinal accelerations

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Fig. 13

Simulation results for various passenger loads (a) and (b) frontal crash forces and longitudinal accelerations of the first car with initial crush zone design, (c) and (d) frontal crash forces and longitudinal accelerations of the first car with modified design of crush force, (e) and (f) frontal crash forces and longitudinal accelerations of the first car with modified design of crush length

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Fig. 14

Wheel-rail contact forces on the first car (a) initial design of crush zones, (b) modified design of crush force, (c) modified design of crush length, and (d) better design of crush force

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